SQLCLR vs SQL Server 2017, Part 8: Is SQLCLR Deprecated in Favor of Python or R (sp_execute_external_script)?

With the additional (and annoying) configuration step required to get SQLCLR Assemblies to load starting in SQL Server 2017, some people have been wondering what is going on with SQLCLR. Considering that this new restriction is the only real change to SQLCLR since SQL Server 2012 (three versions ago), then with (limited) support for languages… Continue reading SQLCLR vs SQL Server 2017, Part 8: Is SQLCLR Deprecated in Favor of Python or R (sp_execute_external_script)?

Safely and Easily Use High-Level Permissions Without Granting Them to Anyone: Database-level

Come see how easy it truly is to "grant" high-level permissions in the safest, most granular, most controllable way.

SQLCLR vs. SQL Server 2012 & 2014 & 2016, Part 7: “CLR strict security” – The Problem Continues … in the Past (Wait, What?!?)

Using SQLCLR on SQL Server 2012, 2014, or 2016? Jealous of the "fun" those on SQL 2017 are having with "CLR strict security"? Come see how you can join the party 😼

Safely and Easily Use High-Level Permissions Without Granting Them to Anyone: Server-level

Come see how easy it truly is to "grant" high-level permissions in the safest, most granular, most controllable way.

Server Audit Mystery 2: Filtering action_id gets Error Msg 25713

Server Audits allow filtering on certain fields. Two fields claim to be strings, yet don't accept strings for filters. Here's how I figured out filtering on action_id (i.e. the event) 🙂

Server Audit Mystery 1: Filtering class_type gets Error Msg 25713

Server Audits allow filtering on certain fields. Two fields claim to be strings, yet don't accept strings for filters. Here's how I figured out filtering on class_type (i.e. object type) 🙂

PLEASE, Please, please Stop Using Impersonation, TRUSTWORTHY, and Cross-DB Ownership Chaining

Module Signing was introduced in SQL Server 2005, and yet people are still using Impersonation and TRUSTWORTHY. This needs to stop.

SQLCLR vs. SQL Server 2017, Part 4: “Trusted Assemblies” – The Disappointment

"Trusted Assemblies", introduced in RC1 of SQL Server 2017, seems like a reasonable fix for one, if not two, problems resulting from the new "CLR strict security" setting. But are there any problems with it? And even if not (don't worry, there are), might there be a better approach? Perhaps something simple that was overlooked?

SQLCLR vs. SQL Server 2017, Part 1: “CLR strict security” – The Problem

The Good, the Bad, and the Ugle̅e̅ (need to avoid copyright infringement 😉 ) SQL Server 2017 is soon to be officially released (i.e. RTM) and there are some impressive changes, with some being impressively good, and some being impressively bad. The Good Some amazingly good changes are: Linux as a platform (see my editorial… Continue reading SQLCLR vs. SQL Server 2017, Part 1: “CLR strict security” – The Problem